Today's #ProjectCheer is delivered to you by Nicki ( @NickiInNY ) If you don't know what 25 Days of Cheer is all about, read this!

Day 5: Play a game [with kids].

Light
It is almost the shortest day of the year. Light is becoming less prevalent and you are probably thinking
that I am a crazy person for wanting to write about light. Guess what? I may be a bit crazy but light is the
one thing we all celebrate and want here in the Northern Hemisphere during the winter months.
A few years back - my youngest is in 11th grade now and this was when he was in 3rd grade - I volunteered
to go into his class for the winter holiday party. Elementary schools these days are very politically correct,
even if the students do not understand what this is, so as to keep all the parents happy. I knew I could
not go into this class and play a game that might be Christian or might be Jewish. I had to come up with
something that was neutral. What did I decide to do? I decided, since they had spent time at the beginning
of the month learning about holiday traditions in various countries, to play BINGO. Instead of the word
BINGO across the top of the board, I looked for a five letter word that was holiday geared. LIGHT! That
is what I came up with because think of all the country’s holiday traditions - and all the religions of the
world whose traditions - involve light.
Christianity celebrates the birth of Jesus. This birth of the King was announced by a star in the sky - a
light. Judaism celebrates Hanukkah - the time when there was not enough oil for the light in the temple
yet the lights burned for eight days. Kwanzaa is a cultural celebration that celebrates family, community
and culture. The Mishumaa Saba are the seven candles where each signifies a different principle. Candles
equal light.
When we look to European traditions, I remember studying the Feast of Saint Lucia when I was young.
In Sweden, Saint Lucia visits children with a crown of candles on her head. Again, there is light in this
tradition.
So as we journey slowly towards the shortest day of the calendar year, remember that light is important.
Light is what we all celebrate this time of year. Light is what we all seek this time of year. We want the
days to get longer, the sun to shine bright and longer. We want lightLigh

It is almost the shortest day of the year. Light is becoming less prevalent and you are probably thinking that I am a crazy person for wanting to write about light. Guess what? I may be a bit crazy but light is the one thing we all celebrate and want here in the Northern Hemisphere during the winter months.

A few years back - my youngest is in 11th grade now and this was when he was in third grade - I volunteered to go into his class for the winter holiday party. Elementary schools these days are very politically correct, even if the students do not understand what this is, so as to keep all the parents happy. I knew I could not go into this class and play a game that might be Christian or might be Jewish. I had to come up with something that was neutral. What did I decide to do? I decided, since they had spent time at the beginning of the month learning about holiday traditions in various countries, to play BINGO. Instead of the word BINGO across the top of the board, I looked for a five letter word that was holiday geared. LIGHT! That is what I came up with because think of all the country’s holiday traditions - and all the religions of the world whose traditions - involve light.

Christianity celebrates the birth of Jesus. This birth of the King was announced by a star in the sky - a light. Judaism celebrates Hanukkah - the time when there was not enough oil for the light in the temple yet the lights burned for eight days. Kwanzaa is a cultural celebration that celebrates family, community and culture. The Mishumaa Saba are the seven candles where each signifies a different principle. Candles equal light.

When we look to European traditions, I remember studying the Feast of Saint Lucia when I was young. In Sweden, Saint Lucia visits children with a crown of candles on her head. Again, there is light in this tradition.

So as we journey slowly towards the shortest day of the calendar year, remember that light is important. Light is what we all celebrate this time of year. Light is what we all seek this time of year. We want the days to get longer, the sun to shine bright and longer. We want light.

Nicki is a runner in upstate NY and enjoys art, cooking, friends and her kids. You can find on Twitter @NickiInNY and her website.

Photo by: KIUKO

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